Localization Archives | Rubric

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Right now, the primary content strategy for businesses should be video marketing. Static images and text-only posts are no longer enough to resonate with your audience online. Video is an unequivocal marketing revolution and brands need to embrace this format wholeheartedly to reap its global rewards.

These stats offer eye-opening highlights:

  • Social videos are shared 1200% more than text and images, combined.
  • 5 billion YouTube videos are consumed every day.
  • Video can raise email click-through rates by 200–300%.
  • 6 billion video adverts are consumed online every year.
  • 45% of users watch over an hour of Facebook or YouTube videos a week.
  • 500 million people use Instagram Stories every day.

These statistics can’t be ignored. And when these lines of communication are so easily accessible, brands need to ensure their content resonates across linguistic boundaries. To achieve this, you need a solid video localization strategy.

The different kinds of video localization on the market

Over and above budget, turnaround time, and production value, video localization should be determined by the end-user. Additionally, it’s imperative that video localization is factored into the authoring process as early as possible (whether it’s your content partner managing the localization or an internal team).

  • Subtitles

    Is the video intended for someone scrolling through their social media feeds? If so, you may want to consider adding subtitles — 85% of Facebook videos and two thirds of Snapchat videos are watched on mute. If the piece of content is intended for multilingual audiences and your timings are tight, adding subtitles is a quick method for getting your message out there. According to research, subtitles improve comprehension, meaning your messaging is far more likely to be understood and remembered when using closed captions.

  • Voiceover

    Does your video contain a lot of information or is it intended for research purposes? If so, you may want to open your contact list and get your favorite voiceover artist into the studio. Voiceovers lend themselves to multimedia assets such as eLearning courses, product and marketing videos, and instructional pieces because they allow the user to pause, rewind, and study at their leisure.

  • Simple User Interface

    TechSmith explains: “It can be difficult to onboard users to new and complex interfaces and workflows. Too much information can easily overwhelm the user and make it difficult to keep the focus on the essential feature or functionality.”

    Enter the Simple User Interface (SUI) and our collaboration with TechSmith, the industry-leader in screen recording and screen capture. Essentially, SUI involves removing or simplifying unnecessary elements in favor of essential, recognizable iconography that multilingual markets can easily understand. A SUI interface is an excellent visual aid for quick, uncluttered user education because it takes cognitive overload out of the equation.

    For this reason, Rubric has teamed with TechSmith to make presentation easier through a marriage of simple visualization cues and scalable localization techniques.

Video Localization best practices

Consider the following best practices when laying down your video localization foundation:

  • Inform your localization strategy by learning what your customers need and expect from video content.
  • Aim for collaborative video localization from the get-go by commissioning the skills of a trusted Global Content Partner. Rubric’s partnership with TechSmith has resulted in high-quality marketing, tutorial, and onboarding videos that wouldn’t have been possible had they been attempted in siloes.
  • Design your video with localization in mind by keeping things simple: use iconography instead of text, universal examples, and a simplified user interface.
  • Ensure that you’re giving your end-user the information, context, and guidance they need.

In the end, whichever type of video localization you choose, it needs to account for your target market’s cultural nuances. For example:

  • Does your subtitle lexicon include slang and other unique colloquialisms?
  • Does your voiceover artist employ a cadence that your targeted audience will understand, enjoy, and respond to?
  • Does your SUI use similar visual cues as the market it’s intended for?

 

Rubric is a customer-centric, Global Content Partner. We partner with multinational companies, like TechSmith, to help them achieve their global strategy goals. We’re pushing the boundaries of video localization and experimenting with new, innovative technologies for greater resonance across multilingual markets. We live for collaboration. We’d like to do the same for you. Rubric’s two-day workshop will analyze actual video and content examples from your business to advise on the localization strategies you should be implementing to maximize your reach.


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How translation memory cuts costs and elevates Global Content

As digital information expands, translation memory (TM) evolves with it. And today, TM systems are the most used translation applications in the world. A TM system is a complex undertaking that requires a particular skill set.

What is translation memory? In short, translation memory is a comprehensive database that recycles previous translations to be used in new text. By leveraging past translations, a translator can assess whether an automatically generated suggestion is appropriate for the text they’re adapting.

Uwe Reinke of Cologne University of Applied Sciences explains it as such:

“The idea behind its core element, the actual “memory” or translation archive, is to store the originals and their human translations of e-content in a computer system, broken down into manageable units, generally one sentence long. Over time, enormous collections of sentences and their corresponding translations are built up in the systems.”

This process not only saves time and effort, but maintains a high level of quality and consistency across Global Content projects.

The key benefits of translation memory

  • Cumulative savings

    A TM database “learns” from previous projects. When you begin a new one, the new text is segmented and analyzed against past translations to produce matches in your database. Over time, the accumulation of translation memory “knowledge” decreases costs on future translations, while expanding the depth of your text database.

  • Quick Turnaround

    Rubric was tasked with delivering a new level of weather personalization and global localization with AccuWeather’s Universal Forecast Database. From English to Korean, Rubric was able to reduce 1,000,000 words for translation to just 50,000. And though it took a year, we consider the completion of a project this vast to be quick turnaround. For further information about AccuWeather, keep reading.

  • Superior translations

    TM also aids in a translator’s accuracy and output. By aligning your business’s vocabulary, tone, and style, you give a translator the foundation they need to produce high quality translations.

The role of machine translation in translation memory

Simply put, machine translation (MT) is the automation of the translation process by computer. Where translation memory requires a human translator, machine translation is used in combination with TM to hasten project delivery without the need for human input.

There are a number of MT engines available:

  • Generic

    Google Translate, Bing, and similar are grouped here. These platforms provide quick translations to millions of people around the world and can be purchased by companies for API-integration into their systems.

  • Customizable

    An MT element that can be used to improve the accuracy of a business’s vocabulary within a specific field, be it medical, legal, or financial. Customizable MT can factor in a company’s own style and lexicon too.

  • Adaptive

    Introduced by Lilt in 2016, followed by SDL a year later, adaptive MT has greatly improved a translator’s output and is expected to challenge TM in the coming years.

In all cases, MT will attempt to create translated sentences from what it’s learned. For example, it may parse two or three TM matches and automatically combine them to complete a sentence. The result is often the kind of garbled, ungrammatical translation Google Translate produces at times. Because of this risk, a human translator should be available to audit and edit the results for project success.

Gaining efficiencies from large, repetitive texts such as product catalogues is an art that Rubric excels at. We analyze and filter texts to breakdown the component phrases and reduce the unique text for translation. Here’s how we introduce the human element into the act of translation.

How does Rubric use translation memory?

We briefly mentioned our involvement in AccuWeather’s Universal Forecast Database. Through content analysis and manipulation, we were able to translate an exhaustive database of weather phrases into form forecasts such as “sunny, mostly clear, with changing clouds in the afternoon”. Because the component phrase ‘sunny’ was repeated in the file thousands of times, we wanted to ensure we leveraged one translation for all of the repetitions to save costs. We achieved this by translating the above example phrase and ‘sunny’ separately.

Translators were then able to focus on the unique component phrases, while checking them against full weather forecast phrases for grammatical accuracy. With this approach we were able to reduce the scope of the database project from 1,000,000 words to around 50,000. The resultant savings in both cost and time were staggering.

Previous translations where the source text is identical to the new text, or partially matches it, can also be stored in translation memory. In either case, the TM will propose any matching database entries for the translator to use as they see fit.

TM can also be programmed to store translations by product. This is vital for when you have a new product and want to prioritize the order of multiple product TMs to assess how appropriate multiple translations would be. For example, using Windows XP terminology versus Windows 8, or Android terminology against iOS.

 

 

Rubric is a customer-centric, Global Content Partner. We partner with multinational companies to help them achieve their global strategy goals. Need help expanding globally? A trusted Global Content Partner will guide, expand, and strengthen the quality and impact of your translation. Sign up for a two-day workshop where we’ll analyze actual content examples from your business to show you how we can house, maintain and manipulate your TMs in a structured, consistent way across markets.


Françoise Henderson
February 23, 2018
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Humans are estimated to have used spoken language for over 100,000 years. Written language, on the other hand, dates back only to around 6,500 years ago. This is why hearing words spoken to us comes far more naturally than reading them on a page. After all, infants start speaking naturally from 18 months old, while it can take up to seven or eight years to learn how to read.


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