Françoise Henderson, Author at Rubric - Page 2 of 3

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In June of this year, iconic motorcycle manufacturer Harley Davidson announced that it is planning to move some of its production away from the US to facilities in Australia, Brazil, India, and Thailand. This is a direct response to an increasingly hostile trade environment between the United States and the European Union. Specifically, the United States introduced tariffs on metals produced in the EU and elsewhere, which prompted tariffs in response. These retaliatory tariffs, combined with the increased cost of the metal, are expected to increase annual costs for Harley Davidson by between $90 million and $ 100 million, with each new bike costing the company an average of $2,200 more to produce.


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On June 4th Microsoft announced its plan to acquire the popular developer platform GitHub for $7.5 billion, with the acquisition set to close later on in the year. While this news shouldn’t come as a surprise to those in the tech industry — after all, since Satya Nadella became CEO Microsoft has positioned itself as a key player in the open source community and is currently the single largest contributor to GitHub — many nevertheless feel that the move is a cause for concern.

As a quick refresher, GitHub is a website that developers use to store and share code. Founded in San Francisco in 2008, the site has grown into a platform used by over 27 million developers around the world, and currently hosts over 80 million code repositories. GitHub is not only the most used developer platform in the world, it has additionally come to represent the developer community as a whole; particularly the open source ethos of sharing and collaboration across traditional boundaries.

For businesses with multilingual customers around the world, GitHub plays a pivotal role in creating Global Content that can easily be adapted to different regions. For example, Global Content Partners interconnect directly with their clients’ GitHub repositories thereby greatly reducing developer effort required to roll out languages.

What does the acquisition entail?

According to the terms of the deal, the GitHub platform will become a part of Microsoft’s cloud computing unit. Furthermore, founder and CEO Chris Wanstrath will become a technical fellow at Microsoft. Satya Nadella has also released a statement about the acquisition, assuring the community that it will in no way detract from the utility and availability of the GitHub platform:

“We recognize the responsibility we take on with this agreement. We are committed to being stewards of the GitHub community, which will retain its developer-first ethos, operate independently and remain an open platform. We will always listen to developer feedback and invest in both fundamentals and new capabilities.”

What does this mean for businesses that use GitHub?

If Microsoft and its CEO are to be taken at face value, businesses who use GitHub have nothing to worry about: their code will continue to be hosted on the platform and their developers will continue to be a part of the community.

Looking at Microsoft’s track record, there is reason to assume this will be the case. When LinkedIn was acquired by Microsoft in late 2016, for example, the site was largely unchanged for its users continued to operate with a significant degree of independence.

The true test, however, will be whether Microsoft’s key competitors decide to take their code off GitHub turn to another platform — or, as it quite possible, create a platform of their own. If this happens, the developer community risks becoming fragmented and losing its core philosophy of sharing and collaboration.

If you’re interested in learning about the benefits of a Trusted Global Content Partner, and how your company can navigate the ever-changing international business environment, get in touch with a member of the Rubric team today.

Photo by Anthony Garand on Unsplash


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In 2014, Amway introduced The Voice as a platform for its independent business owners to communicate, collaborate, and share ideas. But while The Voice looked great on paper, Amway quickly realized that facilitating clear and productive communication was more complicated than they had initially expected. Amway Business Owners (ABOs) come from all corners of the globe, speaking a combined total of over 60 languages.


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It’s great to have a phenomenal product and the desire for it to be accessible on a global level. But that means ensuring that your business processes are ready to meet your clients’ expectations in all your target markets.  For localization to be successful, however, it’s vital that you implement a company-wide strategy. This will greatly assist your localization team to achieve their goals and ensure high-quality work.

Several strands make up a successful strategy:

  • Corporate-focused:

This strand centers on the granular details of a company: How to differentiate yourself from your competitors, the finer details of your services or products, and the specifics of your target market.

 

  • Processes:

This strand focuses on what globalization processes should be or have been implemented in your organization. More specifically, it revolves around what those localization processes are or need to be for every department to ensure that localization is optimal across the board for each region targeted.

 

  • Content:

The content  strand outlines exactly which content you want localized in order to reach your target audiences and ensure your customers have a phenomenal customer experience.

By implementing these three strands, you are successfully executing on your localization strategy, which will have a better chance of success. Let’s take a look at the advantages of integrating these strands on a granular level:

  • By thinking of the global picture from the outset of product (or service) development, you are in a much better position to cater for various markets from the get-go instead of having to adapt products later on, which could prove costly or impossible.
  • Excellent and high-quality localization means cooperation and collaboration between all key departments such as product development, marketing and sales. By getting them on the same page early, your localization efforts will be born out of teamwork, which means that those efforts are more likely to be successful.
  • ‘Ad hoc’ localization efforts are invariably disjointed, expensive and misaligned with company goals. Even ‘cost-effective’ ad hoc solutions turn out to be expensive if they mean making changes to services or products or recreating content entirely. That’s why a localization strategy that forms an integral part of the company’s product development is so important.

If the idea of implementing localization strategies makes perfect sense to you and you think it will transform your globalization efforts, then here are some things you can do to start implementing them.

See that localization is communicated to the entire company so that its value is seen across departments. Once there is understanding and buy-in from individuals throughout the company, strategies can be rolled out as part of the company’s overarching strategy. It’s a good idea to take a look at cold hard facts and figures when showing colleagues the value of localization. Take a look at what additional revenue might be generated because of localization, and then take a look at the localization budget vs. the return on investment due to localization.

It’s especially important to ensure that upper management sees the value of localization, so ensure that they understand the return on investment that it can provide. If you have them on board it will be infinitely easier to get buy-in from the rest of the company and to get solid plans for localization woven into the fabric of the company’s primary business processes.

Once you have the key stakeholders on board, it’s crucial to explain to each of the departments how beneficial the process is if tasks are executed properly the first time. Localization can become costly when tasks need to be reworked or redone entirely. This can have a domino effect on different areas of the company. Making sure everything is done right the first time means that identifying exactly which markets your company will focus on right at the beginning is vital. Think carefully about which markets you want to target. Consider analyzing the value of each market to your company – both in terms of actual figures and where you would like to be into the future. Once you have analyzed them, apply a tiered rating. This will give you and your company greater understanding of which markets to focus on.

Once you have tiered the markets, do a content audit to determine what content is already available and then figure out which should be leveraged and localized for each tier. This is a big job and should probably be done in stages and department by department.

Keep in mind that the stakeholders that commission the implementation of localization are often not involved in the strategy. That’s why it’s so important that they understand the overarching themes, ideas, markets, and goals. You need to make sure that communication is clear and directed to those who will execute the tasks. It’s essential that everyone is on the same page and clearly understands what needs to be done.

If the localization strategies are poorly implemented or non-existent, you are probably going to see people scramble to complete last minute jobs. This means that things can’t run smoothly, processes can’t be customized and implemented across the board, and the right tools probably won’t be used. It will undoubtedly affect both the quality and the delivery of localized content.

Do you feel that implementing solid localization processes and strategies is definitely right for your company but not sure where to start or worried about how time-consuming it would be? Then contact us at Rubric. We can discuss your localization needs and the ample benefits of implementing the Localization Maturity Model, ensuring that your company is truly able to go global.



It’s great to have a phenomenal product and the desire for it to be accessible on a global level. But that means ensuring that your business processes are ready to meet your clients’ expectations in all your target markets. For localization to be successful, however, it’s vital that you implement a company-wide strategy. This will greatly assist your localization team to achieve their goals and ensure high-quality work.

Several strands make up a successful strategy:

  • Corporate-focused:

This strand centres on the granular details of a company: How to differentiate yourself from your competitors, the finer details of your services or products, and the specifics of your target market.

  • Processes:

This strand focuses on what globalization processes should be or have been implemented in your organization. More specifically, it revolves around what those localization processes are or need to be for every department to ensure that localization is optimal across the board for each region targeted.

  • Content:

The content strand outlines exactly which content you want to be localized in order to reach your target audiences and ensure your customers have a phenomenal customer experience.

By implementing these three strands, you are successfully executing on your localization strategy, which will have a better chance of success. Let’s take a look at the advantages of integrating these strands on a granular level:

  • By thinking of the global picture from the outset of product (or service) development, you are in a much better position to cater for various markets from the get-go instead of having to adapt products later on, which could prove costly or impossible.
  • Excellent and high-quality localization means cooperation and collaboration between all key departments such as product development, marketing and sales. By getting them on the same page early, your localization efforts will be born out of teamwork, which means that those efforts are more likely to be successful.
  • ‘Ad hoc’ localization efforts are invariably disjointed, expensive and misaligned with company goals. Even ‘cost-effective’ ad hoc solutions turn out to be expensive if they mean making changes to services or products or recreating content entirely. That’s why a localization strategy that forms an integral part of the company’s product development is so important.

If the idea of implementing localization strategies makes perfect sense to you and you think it will transform your globalization efforts, then here are some things you can do to start implementing them.

See that localization is communicated to the entire company so that its value is seen across departments. Once there is understanding and buy-in from individuals throughout the company, strategies can be rolled out as part of the company’s overarching strategy. It’s a good idea to take a look at cold hard facts and figures when showing colleagues the value of localization. Take a look at what additional revenue might be generated because of localization, and then take a look at the localization budget vs. the return on investment due to localization.

It’s especially important to ensure that upper management sees the value of localization, so ensure that they understand the return on investment that it can provide. If you have them on board it will be infinitely easier to get buy-in from the rest of the company and to get solid plans for localization woven into the fabric of the company’s primary business processes.

Once you have the key stakeholders on board, it’s crucial to explain to each of the departments how beneficial the process is if tasks are executed properly the first time. Localization can become costly when tasks need to be reworked or redone entirely. This can have a domino effect on different areas of the company. Making sure everything is done right the first time means that identifying exactly which markets your company will focus on right at the beginning is vital. Think carefully about which markets you want to target. Consider analyzing the value of each market to your company – both in terms of actual figures and where you would like to be into the future. Once you have analyzed them, apply a tiered rating. This will give you and your company greater understanding of which markets to focus on.

Once you have tiered the markets, do a content audit to determine what content is already available and then figure out which should be leveraged and localized for each tier. This is a big job and should probably be done in stages and department by department.

Keep in mind that the stakeholders that commission the implementation of localization are often not involved in the strategy. That’s why it’s so important that they understand the overarching themes, ideas, markets, and goals. You need to make sure that communication is clear and directed to those who will execute the tasks. It’s essential that everyone is on the same page and clearly understands what needs to be done.

If the localization strategies are poorly implemented or non-existent, you are probably going to see people scramble to complete last minute jobs. This means that things can’t run smoothly, processes can’t be customized and implemented across the board, and the right tools probably won’t be used. It will undoubtedly affect both the quality and the delivery of localized content.

Do you feel that implementing solid localization processes and strategies is definitely right for your company but not sure where to start or worried about how time-consuming it would be? Then contact us at Rubric. We can discuss your localization needs and the ample benefits of implementing the Localization Maturity Model, ensuring that your company is truly able to go global.


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Companies take many factors into consideration when setting budgets. More often than not, localization is seen as an additional cost, making it extremely difficult to do business across borders. If you take a different approach though and look at localization in relation to the volume of additional sales it generates, the picture looks quite different. In many companies localization generates $1,000 for every dollar spent on localization. That puts it into perspective, doesn’t it? Which is why it’s so vital for you to ensure that localization is being implemented correctly.

As part of your role, you’d also want to ensure that you are getting the most valuable solution for your company, which is why you would want to measure whether your current service providers and translation agency are actually providing that value. The good news is that you can do this through the Common Sense Advisory’s Localization Maturity Model (or LMM).

The LMM is a framework created to make sure that everything your organization needs for their localization and globalization plans are met, that they are tailored to your specific needs and for you to understand your current standing in the process. No matter which LMM stage your organization is at, there are a set of steps to take to ensure it is successfully implemented. The step we will focus on in this blog post, is that of governance and how benchmarking it will help you to track your most important metrics.

What exactly is governance?

According to the Common Sense Advisory (or CSA), localization governance is explained as “The processes that ensure the efficient use of resources to achieve an organization’s global business goals and compliance with agreed-upon policies and procedures.”

Here are some areas you may want to look at:

  • Where does the money come from?

The finance and/or purchasing departments typically allocate funds to translation. The question, however, is how is it done? Is it part of the general funds allocated (for example, you have x allocated to marketing, y to sales, etc.) or is translation ring-fenced? Does it have its own specifically allocated funds?

  • Service Level Agreements

What Service Level Agreements (SLAs) are in place to ensure localization quality meets required standards? Similarly, what SLAs are in place with regards to linguistic quality, customer service, turnaround, etc.?

  • Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)

Are KPIs linked to costs? What about linking them to revenue? What about customer satisfaction? Is it measured at all? Is your company measuring Total Cost of Ownership (outsourced + internal effort/expenditure)?

  • Functional silos

Is there interdepartmental cooperation and sharing of knowledge? Are there coordinated translation efforts with might lead to a smoother localization path?

Ultimately, you want to ensure that you implement the LMM and conduct the governance step to track your localization efforts and learn on how to improve on them.

Simply put, governance is important because it allows you to ensure the highest standards possible across the board. From ensuring high-quality localized content to keeping within budget and making sure that employees spend their time efficiently. The important thing to remember, is that it’s not just good enough to implement governance processes in place to achieve localization – it can’t be seen in isolation. All the steps to the LMM are important for the optimum localization strategy and success. Interested in finding out more or understanding how this can come together in your business? Contact us at Rubric today.

Photo by Alexander Andrews on Unsplash


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