Françoise Henderson, Author at Rubric | Page 2 of 4

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While many newer systems include a wider set of languages, an underlying issue with “out of the box” translations is that they often don’t factor location into the base system. For example, there are subtle differences between French spoken in France, and Québécois in Canada, especially when you factor in colloquialism. Another example: a company might buy a 3rd party system that comes with existing translations, but they don’t know how to make use of them effectively. And even if they’re translated from the outset, there will likely be modifications needed afterwards.


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In our fast-paced, digitally driven world, adaptability is often what sets a successful business apart from the rest. And where information travels in the blink of an eye, expansion into new, multilingual markets is now more simple and streamlined than ever. But as with most things, if you start out too fast — without the correct contingencies in place — you’ll find yourself hampered down the line.

Today, most businesses are inheriting legacy issues from outdated programs and software, most of which contain important documentation and protocols that need to be retained. Because the rapid acceleration of digital connectivity has rendered much of the older tech obsolete, many a company is left scrambling to upgrade and overhaul.

The impact of a Legacy System overhaul

Legacy systems are often inextricably woven into a business’s daily routines and processes. So relied upon have they become, and for so long, that even a small change can cause a disruptive ripple effect throughout the company. There are other considerations to be mindful of, too:

  • Staff training on the new system you’ve chosen to implement takes time
  • Transferring vital data from the old system to the new can eat up resources
  • There needs to be extra support for the logistical problems that may crop up during the transition

An overhaul will likely put your business on the back foot for a time, hampering your ability to meet impending deadlines or respond to industry fluctuations with agility. This is not to mention how daunting an entire overhaul can seem if you’ve made the decision to handle the upgrade internally.

Translating old software to meet the demands of expansion

Just as a system needs to be upgraded to meet new technological demands, so too does documentation need to be translated to keep up with international acquisitions and company growth. This includes translating old software into new languages, revising said documentation, as well as adapting your company’s internal training programs to reflect the above changes. Following this, a roll-out to all of your multilingual markets needs to happen, taking extra care to ensure that the software and documents are tailored to each location so that nothing is lost in translation.

Global Content — future-proofing your systems for further expansion

Translation should not be an afterthought. The overriding issue is that most manufacturers believe that language can be bolted on at the end. This is an incorrect belief that will harm your business’s scalability. Instead, companies should think in terms of Global Content from the outset. By engaging with a Global Content Partner like Rubric from the start, these expenses and issues can be avoided.

A Global Content Partner will help you achieve your global strategy goals by creating a solid framework from the outset. By guiding you through key content decisions when moving operations into unfamiliar territory, a Global Content Partner can protect you against any issues that arise from miscommunication, too.

With Rubric, you’ll have the ideal Global Content Partner to alleviate much of the stress that comes with necessary system overhauls. Get in touch with us and let’s get started on delivering strategic, goal-orientated Global Content for your business today.


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In June of this year, iconic motorcycle manufacturer Harley Davidson announced that it is planning to move some of its production away from the US to facilities in Australia, Brazil, India, and Thailand. This is a direct response to an increasingly hostile trade environment between the United States and the European Union. Specifically, the United States introduced tariffs on metals produced in the EU and elsewhere, which prompted tariffs in response. These retaliatory tariffs, combined with the increased cost of the metal, are expected to increase annual costs for Harley Davidson by between $90 million and $ 100 million, with each new bike costing the company an average of $2,200 more to produce.


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On June 4th Microsoft announced its plan to acquire the popular developer platform GitHub for $7.5 billion, with the acquisition set to close later on in the year. While this news shouldn’t come as a surprise to those in the tech industry — after all, since Satya Nadella became CEO Microsoft has positioned itself as a key player in the open source community and is currently the single largest contributor to GitHub — many nevertheless feel that the move is a cause for concern.

As a quick refresher, GitHub is a website that developers use to store and share code. Founded in San Francisco in 2008, the site has grown into a platform used by over 27 million developers around the world, and currently hosts over 80 million code repositories. GitHub is not only the most used developer platform in the world, it has additionally come to represent the developer community as a whole; particularly the open source ethos of sharing and collaboration across traditional boundaries.

For businesses with multilingual customers around the world, GitHub plays a pivotal role in creating Global Content that can easily be adapted to different regions. For example, Global Content Partners interconnect directly with their clients’ GitHub repositories thereby greatly reducing developer effort required to roll out languages.

What does the acquisition entail?

According to the terms of the deal, the GitHub platform will become a part of Microsoft’s cloud computing unit. Furthermore, founder and CEO Chris Wanstrath will become a technical fellow at Microsoft. Satya Nadella has also released a statement about the acquisition, assuring the community that it will in no way detract from the utility and availability of the GitHub platform:

“We recognize the responsibility we take on with this agreement. We are committed to being stewards of the GitHub community, which will retain its developer-first ethos, operate independently and remain an open platform. We will always listen to developer feedback and invest in both fundamentals and new capabilities.”

What does this mean for businesses that use GitHub?

If Microsoft and its CEO are to be taken at face value, businesses who use GitHub have nothing to worry about: their code will continue to be hosted on the platform and their developers will continue to be a part of the community.

Looking at Microsoft’s track record, there is reason to assume this will be the case. When LinkedIn was acquired by Microsoft in late 2016, for example, the site was largely unchanged for its users continued to operate with a significant degree of independence.

The true test, however, will be whether Microsoft’s key competitors decide to take their code off GitHub turn to another platform — or, as it quite possible, create a platform of their own. If this happens, the developer community risks becoming fragmented and losing its core philosophy of sharing and collaboration.

If you’re interested in learning about the benefits of a Trusted Global Content Partner, and how your company can navigate the ever-changing international business environment, get in touch with a member of the Rubric team today.

Photo by Anthony Garand on Unsplash


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