Market News Archives | Rubric

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Rubric is pleased to announce that we’ll be attending The Society of Technical Communication’s (STC) 2019 Summit! Now in its 66th year, the STC Summit is the premier conference for the technical communication world.

STC is the largest and oldest professional association dedicated to the advancement of technical communication. The expo brings together our peers for in-depth discussions and presentations on key trends, issues, and cutting-edge solutions.

What is technical communication?

Technical communication simplifies technical or specialized subject matter, such as medical procedures or computer algorithms. STC defines the benefits:

“The value that technical communicators deliver is twofold: They make information more useable and accessible to those who need that information, and in doing so, they advance the goals of the companies or organizations that employ them.”

Who is Rubric?

Founded in 1994, Rubric is a trusted Global Content Partner with a track record of helping multinational companies achieve their global strategy goals via targeted translation for multilingual markets. Some of our clients include Amway, AccuWeather, and Toshiba.

Last year, and with the help of CSA Research, Rubric underwent a re-brand that saw the company pivot to a consumer-centric strategy centered around Global Content. Our new descriptor — your ‘trusted Global Content Partner’ — was born from this shift in focus. As a trusted Global Content Partner, we thrive on collaboration with our clients to solve the challenges and complexities of Global Content. Rubric offers a wide spectrum of localization solutions for organizations that want to market their services globally. This includes translating product and training manuals, ensuring digital content is aligned to a region’s language, as well as market research and guidance from asset ideation through to delivery.

Why did Rubric opt for this model? While traditional translation services may save a company costs, the strategies employed do not deliver the long-term transformational ROI that a trusted Global Content Partner can offer. In fact, by shepherding content from creation to translation to market release, we have proven that a company will save on costly reworks down the line.

What kind of clients do we partner with?

From localizing Amway’s multimedia training collateral to delivering a new level of global weather hyper-localization for AccuWeather, Rubric has delivered translation solutions to some of the world’s largest organizations. We offer solutions in the technology, manufacturing, and software spheres for companies that want their products and services translated for multilingual markets.

Who you’ll meet at the STC Summit

Our management team will be manning the booth — make sure to say hi, they’re looking forward to meeting you!

  • Ian Henderson, Chairman and Chief Technology Officer: Ian is the co-founder of Rubric and has devoted more than 20 years to Rubric’s growth. His foresight and communication prowess has been instrumental in helping clients reap the rewards of globalization and benefit from agile workflows, while still guaranteeing the integrity of their content.
  • Françoise Henderson, Chief Executive Officer: Françoise is the co-founder of Rubric. With over 20 years of experience in corporate management and translation, her leadership of Rubric’s worldwide operations and strategy has proven invaluable. Under her guidance, we’ve generated agile KPI-driven globalization workflows for clients and reduced time-to-market across multiple groups.
Where you’ll find Rubric at the STC Summit

Come meet us at Booth #304 and see some examples of our Global Content Partner strategy in action!

In the meantime, connect with us on social media:

Facebook

Twitter

Linkedin

Here’s to a memorable STC Summit 2019!


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With 5G on the horizon and approaching at speed, AI, machine learning, and voice search will soon have a network to match their processing potential. But what do lightning-quick transfer times and cutting-edge comms tech mean for international brands? Let’s find out.

How artificial intelligence is changing global communication

Raconteur reports that “with the help of parallel text datasets such as Wikipedia, European Parliament proceedings and telephone transcripts from South Asia, machine-learning has now reached the point where translation tools rival their human counterparts.”

No longer the stuff of science fiction, artificial intelligence is powering text-to-speech and speech-to-text functionality across leading platforms and devices. In fact, Google and Amazon are in the midst of a battle to see who emerges as the king of speech technology. Google Cloud has just updated its AI-powered speech tools, meaning that brands and businesses can get access to additional voices and languages:

  • Google Text-to-Speech:

    The product now supports 21 languages, on top of 31 new voices courtesy of WaveNet, a deep neural network for compiling raw audio into realistic, natural voices.

  • Google Speech-to-Text:

    The customer usage data attained through data logging has enhanced Google’s models, enabling video transcription that has 64% fewer transcription errors.

Similar to Google’s Text-to-Speech, Amazon’s Polly is currently turning “text into lifelike speech using deep learning”. While Amazon’s Transcribe falls short of Google Speech’s supported languages, its custom vocabulary offering makes up for it. It’s a fair call to say that both products are equally competitive at the moment.

This leap in translation technology has remarkable implications for online translations and face-to-face communication. In fact, Skype’s Meeting Broadcast is already trialing real-time translation for video meetings, bringing us closer to demolishing the language barrier.

Consumers are demanding localized video content

Not so long ago — in a world of dial-up modems and 56k speeds — static visuals and reams of text were the only viable forms of content delivery. Fast-forward to today’s hyper-fast connection speeds and you have a fertile environment for the video format to thrive. Indeed, you’d be hard pressed to find a social media post or webpage without an easy-to-digest embedded video. In fact, social media video generates 1200% more shares than text and image content combined.

With video now the most popular means of content-consumption online, users are demanding authentic localization from brands. Some considerations:

  • A well-delivered voiceover from a native language speaker conveys the cadence and emotional weight or subtlety of local communication in the region you’re targeting. However, it can be costly to translate and record dialogue for every country you’re delivering the video too.
  • Given that 85% of video on Facebook is watched with the sound off, it makes sense for a business to invest in high-quality subtitles. By accurately voicing (pun intended) the nuances of a country’s language through text, you go a long way towards fostering brand loyalty. Consumers are far more likely to choose a brand that’s taken the time and effort to craft content that’s unique to their region.

Your voice is the command

While we’re already witnessing the rise of Voice Search, it’s predicted that 30% of all website sessions will be without a screen by 2020. Now whether or not that comes to pass, there’s no arguing that Siri, Alexa, and similar have emerged as communicative powerhouses that demand attention.

And with great power comes SEO responsibility. Currently 20% of all Google searches are voice-based. And with this statistic expected to rise exponentially, Google is already ploughing resources into voice search optimization for more accurate website ranking, starting with conditioning users to use voice on mobile phones. To get the best results, it’s important to localize your content and SEO for a particular region so that native speakers can find your product or service with ease.

Make technology your friend with an optimized Global Content strategy

As video, text, and speech technology evolves to facilitate the quick translation of multiple languages, it’s vital your Global Content is aligned with innovation and correctly worked for its intended markets. A Global Content Partner has the experience and expertise to tailor and optimize your messaging to the regions you’re targeting.

If you think your organization might benefit from our managed Global Content services, be sure to sign up for a two-day workshop. In the session, we’ll use actual data and examples from your business to show you exactly what’s working in your processes and what can be improved.


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In June of this year, iconic motorcycle manufacturer Harley Davidson announced that it is planning to move some of its production away from the US to facilities in Australia, Brazil, India, and Thailand. This is a direct response to an increasingly hostile trade environment between the United States and the European Union. Specifically, the United States introduced tariffs on metals produced in the EU and elsewhere, which prompted tariffs in response. These retaliatory tariffs, combined with the increased cost of the metal, are expected to increase annual costs for Harley Davidson by between $90 million and $ 100 million, with each new bike costing the company an average of $2,200 more to produce.


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On June 4th Microsoft announced its plan to acquire the popular developer platform GitHub for $7.5 billion, with the acquisition set to close later on in the year. While this news shouldn’t come as a surprise to those in the tech industry — after all, since Satya Nadella became CEO Microsoft has positioned itself as a key player in the open source community and is currently the single largest contributor to GitHub — many nevertheless feel that the move is a cause for concern.

As a quick refresher, GitHub is a website that developers use to store and share code. Founded in San Francisco in 2008, the site has grown into a platform used by over 27 million developers around the world, and currently hosts over 80 million code repositories. GitHub is not only the most used developer platform in the world, it has additionally come to represent the developer community as a whole; particularly the open source ethos of sharing and collaboration across traditional boundaries.

For businesses with multilingual customers around the world, GitHub plays a pivotal role in creating Global Content that can easily be adapted to different regions. For example, Global Content Partners interconnect directly with their clients’ GitHub repositories thereby greatly reducing developer effort required to roll out languages.

What does the acquisition entail?

According to the terms of the deal, the GitHub platform will become a part of Microsoft’s cloud computing unit. Furthermore, founder and CEO Chris Wanstrath will become a technical fellow at Microsoft. Satya Nadella has also released a statement about the acquisition, assuring the community that it will in no way detract from the utility and availability of the GitHub platform:

“We recognize the responsibility we take on with this agreement. We are committed to being stewards of the GitHub community, which will retain its developer-first ethos, operate independently and remain an open platform. We will always listen to developer feedback and invest in both fundamentals and new capabilities.”

What does this mean for businesses that use GitHub?

If Microsoft and its CEO are to be taken at face value, businesses who use GitHub have nothing to worry about: their code will continue to be hosted on the platform and their developers will continue to be a part of the community.

Looking at Microsoft’s track record, there is reason to assume this will be the case. When LinkedIn was acquired by Microsoft in late 2016, for example, the site was largely unchanged for its users continued to operate with a significant degree of independence.

The true test, however, will be whether Microsoft’s key competitors decide to take their code off GitHub turn to another platform — or, as it quite possible, create a platform of their own. If this happens, the developer community risks becoming fragmented and losing its core philosophy of sharing and collaboration.

If you’re interested in learning about the benefits of a Trusted Global Content Partner, and how your company can navigate the ever-changing international business environment, get in touch with a member of the Rubric team today.

Photo by Anthony Garand on Unsplash


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